Utah Earthquake

Utah Earthquake
Utah Earthquake

A western state in the United States name Utah had a big earthquake of 5.7 magnitudes, and this was the most massive earthquake in Utah state since the 5.9 magnitudes of 1992, which caused substantial damage to Utah. On Wednesday morning a little after 7 a.m a 5.7 magnitude earthquake hit the most populous city of Utah, Salt Lake City. This earthquake created a terrifying moment for Salt Lake City people, an estimate of 2.76 million people likely felt this quake. Most of the people who were at home or in a building at this terrifying moment felt this quake for 10 to 15 seconds. Dishes in the shelves and pictures on the walls were falling at the time of the earthquake, and people were running out of their houses into the streets in panic. This earthquake was so strong that almost 73,000 homes lost electricity in Salt Lake City. Fortunately, even after this big earthquake also damaged some buildings, there weren’t any significant injuries. There was another bad for Utah’s people that there is a 5% chance of another earthquake of the same size that can occur soon, but as time passing the possibility percent is decreasing.

       According to a 2016 report by experts in Utah Earthquake have predicted this earthquake. This report showed that there was a 93% chance of an earthquake occurring in the Wasatch fault zone, which would be more than five magnitudes. But experts can’t predict the exact time, so in the report, there was the possibility of this earthquake in the next 50 years. 

      There is also another prediction of an earthquake, which will be quiet bigger than this one. Experts have predicted that this earthquake could be of magnitude 6.75 or higher, which has a 43% probability. We all remember the shock from 1989, which was 6.9 magnitudes that created a big disaster in Utah. In this earthquake, there were $12 billion damages in today’s rate. Keeping this in mind if the prediction of experts comes true, it will be a big disaster for Utah.

    In this area generally, an earthquake of 5 or larger magnitude occur at an average in every ten years, and a shock of 6 or larger size happens in every 50 years, according to U.S  Geological Survey.